Waxing Methods Compared

21 Apr 2016 12:14 PM | John Ellis (Administrator)

As Promised, here is an installment in my Spring and Summer Series

Comparison of waxing methods

(Overlays not considered)

 

Methods:

Hotbox

Infrared

Belt/Roller

Ironing

Ray’s Way

Corking

Application time

3- 12 hours (*1)

2-5 minutes

2 minutes

5-15 minutes (*2)

5 minutes or less

5 minutes or less

Cure time

.5- 8 hours (*3)

.5-8 hours

10-15 minutes

.5- 8 hours

0 minutes

0 minutes

Finishing time

15-45 minutes

15- 45 minutes

0-2 minutes

15- 45 minutes

2-3 minutes

2-3 minutes

Equipment Cost

$100-250

$5,000 +

$500

$50-500

$20-40

$2-10

Application Cost

if done by shop

$25-40

$15-15

$4-8

$5-15

N/A

N/A

Wax Use per ski

10-15 g.

.5-1 gram

1 gram

10-15 g

.2-.4 gram

.2- .5 gram

Percent Wasted

>90 %

<10% (est.)

<5% (est.)

>90 % (*4)

<5%

<5%

Amount absorbed

.5-3 grams (*5)

Unknown

Unknown

.5-1 gram

>90%

>90%

Best Use

Soft wax soak, new skis.

Hard wax and difficult applications

On hill ease

Cleaning, new skis, HC waxes

LF wax, HF wax, and overlays

On hill quick wax

Worst Use

In a hurry

Soaking

Race Wax

Fluros

Soaking

Soaking

Durability  (*6)

Best

Best

Good

Best

Excellent

Good

 

*1: Hotbox Application Time includes iron waxing time, and varies with purpose

*2: Iron Application time varies depending on purpose and patience. Long ironing must be done carefully.

*3: Cure time is defined as how soon the skis can be scraped, brushed and polished. Soft waxes cure slowly. The hardest waxes should be finished when slightly warm.

*4: Waste wax can be successfully down-cycled as a fire accelerant for those with a fireplace.

*5: Data from my long term study measuring ski weight backs up these estimates.

*6: Durability is generally an over-rated characteristic for racers. The highest performing waxes are only expected to last 1 run or so. But for training, all day protection/glide is very important.

 

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